Jam

Jam

Malagasy Spiced Marmalade

Makes 2 1/2 pints.

Madagascar vanilla and its famous wild pepper, voatsiperifery, add balance and depth to this grapefruit marmalade. Use it to fill thumbprint cookies, serve it with roast chicken, or dollop it on buttered toast.

2 pink grapefruits
1 teaspoon voatsiperifery
1 vanilla bean
2 cups sugar

Peel both grapefruits. Save the peel of one grapefruit and scrape away its pith. (Discard the peel from the other fruit). Slice the scraped peel into thin strips. Cut the grapefruits’ flesh cross-wise into 1/2-inch thick rounds and pick out the seeds. Split the vanilla bean and scrape out the seeds, cut the bean’s husk in half.

Put the grapefruit flesh and peel strips, along with the vanilla seeds and husk into a large, heavy saucepan. Add the voatsiperifery and 4 cups of water. Set the pan over medium-high heat and bring the contents to a boil. Reduce the heat to medium-low and simmer for about 1 1/2 hours, or until the mixture is reduced to about half or three-quarters of its original volume.

Stir in the sugar and let the marmalade simmer until it’s thickened and syrupy, about

another 1 1/2 hours. Pour the marmalade into scalded jars and screw on the jar lids. Leave the jars on the counter until they’re completely cooled, then stow them in the fridge, where they’ll keep happily for a least a couple of months.

Jam

Kandy Spice Pumpkin Jam

Makes about 3 cups or 3 half-pint jars.

Try this jam as an seasonal treat on buttered toast or freshly baked brioche. Add a dollop of pumpkin jam to the dressing for an autumn salad or fill blind-baked tart shells with it and top them with créme fraîche and toasted walnuts. It’s also a nice served with sharp cheddar and hearty crackers.

1 15-ounce can pumpkin
14 ounces sugar
1 tablespoon lemon juice
1½ teaspoons fine sea salt
1½ teaspoons Kandy Spice blend
¼ teaspoon ground cloves

Combine the pumpkin, sugar, and lemon juice in a heavy saucepan and set it over medium-

high heat. Stir to combine and bring to a boil, then reduce the heat to medium and continue to simmer, stirring occasionally, for 12-15 minutes. Pour the hot jam into scalded jars, put on and tighten the lids, and set the jars aside until the jam has cooled to room temperature. Store in the fridge (keeps for months).

You could water-process this jam for shelf-stable storage — if you do, process following time guidelines for “no-pectin” jam recipes and your jar size.

Thanks to our friend and mentor Maura Kilpatrick of Sofra Bakery & Café from whom we learned to make pumpkin jam.

[Sidebar]

Our Kandy Spice blend is inspired by the place in central Sri Lanka where we source our fair-trade cinnamon.

In this recipe, the warm flavors of Kandy Spice are the familiar but interesting companions to pumpkin.

Jam

Sichuan Five Spice Pickled Apples

Makes about 3 cups.

Tart, sweet, and spicy flavors marry well with apples, which share those same flavor notes. Super easy to make, you’ll enjoy these pickled apples with savory dishes, from grilled cheddar sandwiches to pork chops.

2 firm, crisp apples, such as Pink Lady, Pippen, or Ginger Crisp
1/4 cup white wine vinegar
1/2 cup apple cider vinegar
1/2 teaspoon kosher or sea salt
2 teaspoons Sichuan Five Spice blend
4–6 tablespoons Demarara sugar
1/2 teaspoon black peppercorns

Wash a wide-mouth quart jar and its tight-fitting lid with hot soapy water. Set aside.

Make the brine by combining the vinegars, salt, spices, sugar (using the smaller amount for very sweet apples), and 1 cup of water in a small sauce pan. Lightly crush the peppercorns and add them to the pan. Set pan over medium high-heat, boiling the brine for 2 minutes.

While the brine heats, prep the apples. Peel and core the apples, then cut into thinnish slices (about an 18” thick). Put the apples into the jar (you’ll have extra room and could add another apple, if you’d like).

Pour the hot brine over the apples in the jar. Put the lid on the jar and tighten it down. Let the brine cool to room temp, transfer the jar to the fridge. Let the pickles rest in the fridge for at least eight hours, so that all the beautiful flavors can fully develop.

[Sidebar]

Five Spice is a Chinese blend that‘s traditionally used in braised dishes. Our version combines sweet spices — star anise, cassia, coriander, and cloves — with the exciting finish of

Sichuan pepper.

Jam

Sichuan Five Spice Beet Jam with Basil

Makes about 3 cups.

Tart, sweet, and spicy flavors marry well with apples, which share those same flavor notes. Super easy to make, you’ll enjoy these pickled apples with savory dishes, from grilled cheddar sandwiches to pork chops.

2 firm, crisp apples, such as Pink Lady, Pippen, or Ginger Crisp
1/4 cup white wine vinegar
1/2 cup apple cider vinegar
1/2 teaspoon kosher or sea salt
2 teaspoons Sichuan Five Spice blend
4–6 tablespoons Demarara sugar
1/2 teaspoon black peppercorns

Wash a wide-mouth quart jar and its tight-fitting lid with hot soapy water. Set aside.

Make the brine by combining the vinegars, salt, spices, sugar (using the smaller amount for very sweet apples), and 1 cup of water in a small sauce pan. Lightly crush the peppercorns and add them to the pan. Set pan over medium high-heat, boiling the brine for 2 minutes.

While the brine heats, prep the apples. Peel and core the apples, then cut into thinnish slices (about an 18” thick). Put the apples into the jar (you’ll have extra room and could add another apple, if you’d like).

Pour the hot brine over the apples in the jar. Put the lid on the jar and tighten it down. Let the brine cool to room temp, transfer the jar to the fridge. Let the pickles rest in the fridge for at least eight hours, so that all the beautiful flavors can fully develop.

[Sidebar]

Five Spice is a Chinese blend that‘s traditionally used in braised dishes. Our version combines sweet spices — star anise, cassia, coriander, and cloves — with the exciting finish of

Sichuan pepper.